Topic: Alcohol Industry

PRESS RELEASE: Not A Love Story: Heineken In Africa

IOGT International welcomes the new book “Heineken in Africa” (first time published in English) and calls for stronger action to hold Big Alcohol accountable for pervasive Human Rights abuses…

NEWS: DR Congo: Heineken Billboards Glorify War

The multinational beer giant Heineken, the second largest beer producer in the world, has a long history of unethical marketing campaigns. Dutch newspaper NRC reports the latest marketing stunt that transgresses ethical boundaries comes from the Democratic Republic of Congo where Heineken-owned brand Primus launched a billboard campaign that glorifies war.
The gigantic billboards, many of them near roads, depict fighters lifting a rifle into the air. The Swahili caption reads: “This is our beauty.”…

NEWS: Rwanda: Heineken To Sell Beer Below $1

In a move designed to reduce retail prices and boost sales in Rwanda, East Africa and across the African continent, Heineken is starting local production sites. In Rwanda, the country’s biggest beer producer Bralirwa is set to commence Heineken production. Rwanda joins Nigeria, Namibia, South Africa, Algeria, Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia and Ethiopia as local producers of Heineken in Africa…

NEWS: Heineken Under Investigation For New Tax Scheme

Heineken Korea is under investogation for rigging prices to save tax.
The Korean subsidiary of the second largest beer producer in the world, Heineken International, is under investigation by the Korean customs authority for allegedly manipulating original import prices of its beer brands to lower tax. If found guilty of the charges, the tax scheme could mean a fine of more than 10 billion won ($8.9 million)…

REPORT: Australian-First Study Sheds More Light On Factors Influencing Youth Alcohol Use

The study, How do alcohol control policies influence Australian adolescent drinking trends?, is the first Australian study to examine the relative influence of multiple alcohol policies, television alcohol advertising, retail alcohol outlet density and the proportion of alcohol-related articles in daily newspapers, on the alcohol use behaviour of adolescents…

BLOG: Big Alcohol Betting Big Bucks On Super Bowl

Anheuser-Busch InBev is the world’s largest beer producer, controlling every third bottle of beer sold in the world. AB InBev keeps making headlines with gigantic investments in alcohol promotions during major sports events, like the Fifa World Cup, the Super Bowl and other tournaments with global viewerships. This aggressive investment in brand promotion must be understood in direct connection to the beer giant’s performance on the stock markets and its ability to make shareholders happy. Here’s how it works…

REPORT: Hidden Power Of Corporations

The hidden power of corporations Editorial The growing literature on what are termed “the commercial determinants of health” pays particular attention to the hidden and invisible forms of power, whereby large corporations use various methods to shape thinking about what are appropriate responses to the health consequences of their products. In the accompanying article, Susan… Read more »

NEWS: Australia: Controversial Booze Now, Pay Later Scheme

‘Buy now, pay later’ services are emerging as veritable credit schemes in Australia. Instead of paying a deposit in store to secure a commodity for later purchase, customers can get their goods straightaway and can use them and consume them before making a single payment. Afterpay is the biggest provider of such services in Australia. It even allows alcohol to be bought in this manner, a controversial scheme that has come under scrutiny and criticism…

REPORT: Norway: Alcohol Industry Lobbyists Use Science To Advance Own Interests

Alcohol industry actors employed a range of strategies to shape the use of the various types of evidence on on-premise trading hours and violence to advance their own interests. The particular strategies and arguments changed over time as new data and research became available, and also varied between the national and the local levels and by categories of industry actors. There is a need to better understand how the handling of different forms of evidence is accommodated within the political strategies of a range of industry actors in respect of particular policy issues and forms of evidence, at different levels of policy making and in varying policy contexts…