Tagged: Alcohol Justice

NEWS: Study: Big Alcohol Pink-Washing Exposed

A new study in the October issue of Addiction Journal documents alcohol products promoted with pink ribbons, partnerships with breast cancer charities, and general terms such as “breast cancer research” or “cure.” Hundreds of brands promote products with breast cancer awareness ribbons. But pink washing is the term for all the cases when companies that manufacture and market carcinogenic products engage in “cancer awareness and prevention campaigns”.

BLOG: Higher Alcohol Taxes Create More Jobs

The new research gives advocates for evidence-based alcohol policy measures another strong argument to counter Big Alcohol myths about the negative impact of alcohol regulations on the economy…

With the evidence that is now piling up, I think that advocates for public health, societal development and economic sustainability can feel confident in including alcohol policy measures, such as taxation, into the mix of measures that yield benefit across different sectors. This is what we in IOGT International are convinced about: evidence-based alcohol policy measures are useful (and too often still under-used) tools for making the world a better place…

BLOG: Cheers To Trade, Boundless Trade

Those three points make it clear that the TTIP talks must be held in close cooperation with civil society in Sweden, not only with the trade sector. The trade sector is obviously biased. Those three points also make it clear that trade barriers rooted in public health objectives have a value and must be protected.

Big Alcohol and Big Tobacco are using trade talks more and more aggressively to erode and circumvent public health policies. It is in this context that journalists must perform a better job in being a watchdog of decision-makers and the government must realise – once they wake up from the day dreaming about Obama – that boundless trade does not propel development and welfare but threaten and erode it…

BLOG: Portman Group Boasts New Self-Regulations As Evidence Mounts About Their Failing

It is 2013, 21st century, and after years of social responsibility campaigns the alcohol industry still believes it is good news to come out in an obvious promotion article and proclaim they now put an end to sexualising and objectifying women in their marketing…

BLOG: Culture – A Hot topic At #CSW57

Another reason of not going against a culture is our realization that it is something that we have been part of, perpetuating on a smaller or a bigger scale. Admitting that the culture is dysfunctional, we actually admit that we, as a part of it, have been doing something wrong. That’s a tough one for many egos. So we better find excuses and go on with the harmful culture passing it on to the coming generations.

So imagine the alcohol norm. Imagine all the parties, all the celebrations of birthdays, newborns, sport victories, cosy evenings or lonely days when people use alcohol as a part of the culture that says, that screams out loud, that all those events are to be cheered to with a bottle of alcohol.

BLOG: Thanks Paramount Pictures For Showing Alcoholic With Budweiser

Alcohol corporations want you to believe that their brand is the source of success and attraction. Anheuser-Busch InBev shares this view. They exposed their hypocritical and nonsensical view of the world by complaining about their brand showing up in the movie, “Flight”, starring Denzel Washington. Let me go out on a limb here: Isn’t it therefore reasonable to estimate that there are 18,000 “Anheuser-Busch-related” deaths in the US each year, and AB InBev costs government and the public $51 billion annually? If AB InBev has a problem with my estimates, they can offer their estimate of which brands are causing the harm and death, and by what percentage. Budweiser’s tag line “Enjoy Responsibly” doesn’t sound joyful any longer to 18,000 deceased.

BLOG: Deconstructing ICAP’s Recent Misadventures in the Global Policy Arena

What is happening to the International Center for Alcohol Policies (ICAP)? For an organization that proudly boasts about its “analysis, balance and partnership,” ICAP’s façade of corporate social responsibility has been undermined by a recent series of bombshell revelations.