Tagged: Busting Myths

BLOG: Addiction Stigma And Big Alcohol Myths

Maintaining the collective illusion that the only people who have real alcohol problems are those homeless social deviants is crucial for Big Alcohol’s bottom line. It’s also immoral. And it’s our duty to change it, to shatter myths, end stigma and promote an evidence-based discourse about alcohol and related harms…

NEWS: Alcohol Addiction: Abstinence More Successful Path

More difficult to achieve controlled alcohol use than to live alcohol-free completely
People who are seeking treatment for alcohol use disorders and whose goal is to quit alcohol use entirely are more likely to achieve this goal if they are treated by a care provider who advocates total abstinence. Those who wish to learn to consume alcohol in a controlled manner are not as successful, even when they are treated by a care provider who works with controlled consumption. These are the results of a study carried out at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden…

NEWS: Health Benefits Of Alcohol Are Overrated

A recent study debunks the long-held myth that (“moderate”) alcohol consumption is beneficial for a person’s health. Studies have and keep reporting that wine is good for the heart. And the alcohol industry does what it can to perpetuate that myth – so Western culture has come to accept and embrace it. However, many of such studies also fail to look at research that says otherwise. In fact, one research of note states that abstaining from alcohol consumption, even for just a month, will boost health immensely…

NEWS: Study: Alcohol Smell Lowers Self-Control

New research from Edge Hill University shows that the smell of alcohol may make it harder for people to control their behavior. During the computer-based study, participants were asked to wear a face mask that was either laced with alcohol, or a non-alcoholic citrus solution. Participants were then instructed to press a button when either the letter K or a picture of a beer bottle appeared on their screen. The researchers measured the number of times the participants incorrectly pressed the button causing a ‘false alarm’. These false alarms indicate a reduction in the participant’s power to inhibit their behaviour when they were expected to. Results showed that the number of ‘false alarms’ were higher in participants who were wearing the alcohol treated mask…