Tagged: HIV/ Aids

BLOG: Alcohol Industry Wreaking Havoc Around Zimbabwe

Other people I spoke to are of the opinion that the authorities are deliberately turning a blind eye to the proliferation of both legal and illegal alcohol outlets in an attempt to shock absorb the frustration and discontent resulting from the increasing economic hardships…

REPORT: Assessment Effects On Alcohol Use By Persons With HIV In Rural Uganda

The researchers found no evidence of assessment reactivity in a study that included quarterly study visits. Assessment is not sufficient to act as an intervention itself in this population with high levels alcohol consumption. Interventions are needed to decrease alcohol consumption in this population…

EVENT: CSW61 Side Event: Alcohol Policy A Women’s Rights Issue

The Permanent Mission of The Republic of Botswana to the United Nations in collaboration with IOGT International cordially invites you to a UN Side Event at the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (CSW61).
ALCOHOL POLICY AS A WOMEN’S RIGHTS ISSUE – Response to violence against women and girls through addressing structural and underlying causes…

NEWS: Infectious Diseases: Looming Epidemic In Russia

Last year, approximately 95,000 people were newly infected with HIV in Russia. It’s the only region in the world where the HIV/ AIDS epidemic continues to spread. Frequent places for contracting viruses of infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis and HIV are prisons, where a perfect storm seems to be gathering driving a massive epidemic…

NEWS: UN AIDS Science Now: Alcohol & Sex Workers

Addressing alcohol use can improve structural factors in the lives of sex workers
Modifying structural drivers of the HIV/ AIDS epidemic, such as alcohol, violence, or socio-economic status is a challenging but necessary component of developing sustainable, effective solutions to the HIV epidemic.
A new study called “The impact of an alcohol harm reduction intervention on interpersonal violence and engagement in sex work among female sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya: Results from a randomized controlled trial” presents findings from an individually randomised trial, where female sex workers were randomised to receive an individual-level programme focused on alcohol and substance use, and to assess non-alcohol associated outcomes of violence, and indirectly economic vulnerability. While the programme did not produce persistent effects at six months for all components, it very usefully demonstrated how addressing alcohol use, a structural factor central to sex workers’ lives, can potentially also improve non-alcohol associated outcomes…