Tagged: Taxation

Designing Alcohol Taxes: Evidence From The UK Market

This column argues that variation in preferences for different products and in price responsiveness across heavy and light alcohol users provides scope to improve welfare by varying tax rates across alcohol products. The proposed framework is well suited to addressing other sources of external costs, such as obesity…

BLOG: Taxation In East Africa: Why Governments Need Alcohol Taxes

The Public good and public health approach needs to be recognized when considering alcohol taxation. The case of South Africa shows that evidence-based alcohol policy measures, like taxation, can help improve social well being and the economy…

NEWS: Spain: Government Plans For Alcohol Taxation

Spain’s minority government, headed by the Popular Party (PP), is meeting with the main opposition party, the Socialists, to negotiate the terms of the budget plan that the EU is expecting to see in the coming weeks.
The Spanish government explores its options for raising more revenue in 2017. The package is set to include taxes on tobacco and diesel fuel, as well as increasing taxation for alcohol and sugary drinks…

NEWS: UK: Alcohol Sold At Pocket Money Prices

Research released in the United Kingdom today shows there is an abundance of high strength alcohol sold for pocket money prices in shops and supermarkets across the UK.

The report entitled “Cheap alcohol: the price we pay” was compiled by the Alcohol Health Alliance UK (AHA), a group of medical royal colleges, alcohol organisations and health bodies. The report argues that recent cuts in alcohol taxes allow supermarkets to sell alcohol at rock bottom prices…

NEWS: Australia: Alcohol Tax Overhaul To Bolster Budget

Modest but necessary changes to Australia’s alcohol tax regime would deliver a $2.9 billion revenue boost to the Turnbull Government, and an even greater windfall for the health of the nation. New economic modelling has found that a ten per cent increase to all alcohol excise, combined with changes that would tax wine more equitably, would result in a 9.4 per cent reduction in alcohol consumption, with a corresponding reduction in alcohol harms. A new report outlines how Australia would benefit from a new framework of taxing alcohol, which would include an overhaul of how wine is taxed and adding 10% to current excises…