Report
Cancer Toll Grows In LMICs As New Cases Increase Globally

Author
Christina Fitzmaurice, Assistant Professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington
Citation
Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration. Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-years for 32 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2015A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study. JAMA Oncol. Published online December 03, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.5688
  • Source
    JAMA Oncol. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.5688
  • Release date
    03/12/2016

Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-years for 32 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2015.

A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study

New Global Burden of Disease study urges increased prevention efforts and vigilance in early detection and treatment. The Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration has published online a new study in the journal JAMA Oncol.

Significance

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Current estimates on the burden of cancer are needed for cancer control planning.

Research purpose

What is the burden of cancer between 1990 and 2015 at the global, regional, and national level measured in incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted-life-years (DALYs) by sex and age?

Findings

Using the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) methodology, the researchers estimated that in 2015, there were 17.5 million cancer cases, 8.7 million deaths, and 208.3 million DALYs. Between 2005 and 2015, incident cancer cases increased by 33%, of which 12.6% were due to population growth, 16.4% due to an aging population, and 4.1 % due to increasing age-specific incidence rates.

Alcohol and cancer

Alcohol is a class one carcinogen and has been found to be causally linked to at least 7 types of cancers.

Conclusion and Relevance

As part of the epidemiological transition, cancer incidence is expected to increase in the future, further straining limited health care resources.

Appropriate allocation of resources for cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and curative and palliative care requires detailed knowledge of the local burden of cancer.

The Global Burden of Disease 2015 study results demonstrate that progress is possible in the efforts against cancer. However, the major findings also highlight an unmet need for cancer prevention efforts, including tobacco and alcohol control, vaccination, and the promotion of physical activity and a healthy diet.

Source Website: JAMA Oncology