Report
Cognitive Impairments: Evidence For Associations With Alcohol, Other Drug Use

Author
Efrat Aharonovich, Dvora Shmulewitz, Melanie M. Wall, Bridget F. Grant, Deborah S. Hasin
Citation
haronovich, E., Shmulewitz, D., Wall, M. M., Grant, B. F., and Hasin, D. S. (2017) Self-reported Cognitive Scales in a U.S. National Survey: Reliability, Validity, and Preliminary Evidence for Associations with Alcohol and Drug Use. Addiction, doi: 10.1111/add.13911.
  • Source
    Addiction Journal
  • Release date
    17/06/2017

Self-reported Cognitive Scales in a U.S. National Survey: Reliability, Validity, and Preliminary Evidence for Associations with Alcohol and Drug Use

Research Report

Abstract

Aims

To evaluate relationships between measures of cognitive functioning and alcohol or drug use among adults (≥18 years) in the U.S. general population.

Design

Two cognitive scales were created based on dimensionality and reliability of self-reported Executive Function Index items. Relationships between the two scales and validators were evaluated. Associations between the cognitive scales and past-year frequency of alcohol or other drug use were estimated with adjusted odds ratios (aOR).

Setting

USA, using the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, a nationally representative adult sample selected by multistage probability sampling.

Participants

36,085 respondents.

Measurements

Past-year substance use outcome variables categorized binge alcohol use, marijuana, cocaine, opioid, sedative/tranquilizer, and stimulant use as frequent (at least weekly to daily), infrequent (any to 2-3 times/month), or no use, assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-V.

Key predictors were the two cognitive scales. Construct validators included education and functional impairment. Covariates included age, gender, income, and race/ethnicity.

Findings

Nine cognitive items fit a two-factor model (Comparative Fit Index=.973): attention (5 items) and executive functioning (4 items). Both scales were positively associated with higher education (ps<.001) and negatively associated with functional impairment (ps<.001), demonstrating construct validity.

Poorer attention was associated with frequent and infrequent binge alcohol consumption and use of drugs (aOR range=1.07 [binge alcohol use] to 1.72 [stimulants], ps≤0.01).

Poorer executive functioning was associated with frequent binge alcohol intake and use of drugs (aOR range=1.22 [binge alcohol use] to 2.03 [cocaine], ps<0.001), and infrequent use of all drugs (aOR range=1.19 [marijuana] to 1.63 [cocaine], ps<0.001).

Conclusions

Impairments in attention and executive functioning are positively correlated with substance use in the U.S. general population.

Source Website: Addiction