Report
New Zealand Survey: Youth Attitudes And Behavior Towards Alcohol

Author
Susan Cook, Dr Holly Trowland, and Dr Alana Oakly
Citation
Health Promotion Agency (2017) Key Results: Young People aged 15-24 years. Attitudes and Behaviour towards Alcohol Survey 2013/14 to 2015/16. Wellington: Health Promotion Agency
  • Source
    Health Promotion Agency
  • Release date
    21/07/2017

Key Results: Young People aged 15-24 years. Attitudes and Behavior towards Alcohol Survey 2013/14 to 2015/16

This report presents descriptive results about the alcohol-related behaviours, attitudes and experiences of New Zealanders aged 15 to 24 years.

About the report

The Attitudes and Behaviour towards Alcohol Survey (ABAS) is a national survey of people aged 15 years and over about alcohol consumption patterns, alcohol-related behavior, consequences of consuming alcohol, and attitudes. The survey focuses on behaviour in the previous month and on the last alcohol consumption occasion and includes questions on a range of attitudes and opinions towards alcohol. Results from the survey are used to inform the planning and development of alcohol activities, policies and programmes that aim to reduce alcohol-related harm in New Zealand.

About the Health Promotion Agency

The Health Promotion Agency has a particular focus on reducing alcohol-related harm in young people, and the ABAS provides valuable information about alcohol behaviors and attitudes in this population. Young people aged 15 to 24 years accounted for 14% of New Zealand’s population at the 2013 Census. The years up to 24 are critical for human development – they build on experiences of childhood and generate the foundation skills for adulthood.

This publication about young people is the companion document to the key results for adults aged 25+ years.

Method

Results from the 2013/14, 2014/15, and 2015/16 surveys were combined to allow analysis of population subgroups, such as young people aged 15 to 24 years.

In total there were 12,206 responses from the three surveys, including 702 responses from those aged 15 to 17 years and 1,037 responses from those aged 18 to 24 years.

Key findings about young people aged 15 to 24 years

Overall, 33% of young people aged 15 to 17 years and 63% of young people aged 18 to 24 years reported consuming alcohol in the last four weeks.

A smaller proportion of Pacific and Asian young people consumed alcohol in the last four weeks compared with European/Other young people. In the 18 to 24 years age group, a greater proportion of males consumed alcohol in the last four weeks, compared with females.

Around half of young people aged 15 to 24 years who reported consuming alcohol in the last four weeks also reported risky alcohol use behavior. This is greater than reported risky alcohol use behavior in those aged 25 years and over (23%).

A greater proportion of Māori young people reported risky alcohol use behaviour compared with European/Other young people.

In the 18 to 24 years age group, a greater proportion of males reported risky alcohol use behaviour, compared with females. 

Similarly to those aged 25 years and over, young people reported “feeling good, happy or relaxed” and “was able to de-stress, wind down” as the two most common experiences in the last four weeks after using alcohol. 

However, 30% of young people aged 15 to 17 years and 39% of young people aged 18 to 24 years reported at least one experience that may be considered harmful. This is greater than those aged 25 years and over (17%).

A greater proportion of young people agreed with the statements “It’s OK to get drunk as long as it’s not everyday” and “Drunkenness is acceptable in some situations”, compared with those aged 25 years and over.

Conversely, a smaller proportion of young people agreed with the statement “Binge drinking is part of kiwi culture”, compared with those aged 25 years and over.

Source Website: Health Promotion Agency