Report
South Korea: Biking Under Alcohol Influence

Author
Hwang SH, Ahn MR, Han KD, Lee JH
Citation
Hwang SH, Ahn MR, Han KD, Lee JH: The Prevalence of "Drinking and Biking" and Associated Risk Factors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, in: J Korean Med Sci. 2017 Sep;32(9):1396-1400. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2017.32.9.1396
  • Source
    The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences
  • Release date
    01/09/2017

The Prevalence of “Drinking and Biking” and Associated Risk Factors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Abstract

With the steady rise of health and environmental awareness, the number of bicyclists is increasing.

However, there are few epidemiologic studies on bicycling under the influence (BUI).

Study aim

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of BUI and the associated risk factors in a representative Korean population.

Study design

The data of 4,833 adult bicyclists who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012) were analyzed. Among the 4,833 participants investigated in this study, 586 (12.1%) had experienced BUI. As participants’ age increased, so did the prevalence of BUI (P < 0.001), with the participants who were aged 60-69 showing the highest prevalence of BUI (19.6%).

Key findings

With regard to BUI and alcohol consumption habits, the likelihood of being a heavy or high-risk alcohol user increased with the frequency of BUI (P < 0.001).

In addition, there was a positive relationship between the frequency of BUI and alcohol use disorder identification score level.

Finally, those who had previous experiences of BUI were significantly more likely to drive and ride motorcycles under the influence (P < 0.001).

Conclusion

In conclusion, the prevalence of BUI was 12.1% and several associated risk factors for BUI were elucidated in this study.

The development of specific preventive strategies and educational programs aimed at deterring individuals at a high risk of engaging in BUI is expected to reduce the number of alcohol-related bicycle injuries.

Source Website: Pub Med Library