Topic: Research

NEWS: Week #47 Global Alcohol Policy Round-Up

The Week #47 Global Alcohol Policy Round-Up contains alcohol policy updates about Finland and alcohol harm in workplaces, South Korea and new alcohol marketing regulation, Wales and the scheduled introduction of Minimum Unit Pricing, Ireland and new alcohol advertising bans, and latest initiatives to research health promotion taxation. Fresh science updates are about: New data on alcohol use and harm in OECD countries, a compelling analysis of the costs of alcohol in Sweden, analysis of the burden of “deaths of despair” in the United States, as well as an exploration of the impact of parental alcohol use on children. The Big Alcohol monitor exposes: Diageo’s strategy for market domination in India, why Big Alcohol opposes road safety measures in India, why a major Dutch bank has completely divested from the alcohol industry, and that Big Alcohol belongs to the top plastic polluters in the world. On our Global Voices Blog Portal, Kalle writes about new EU rules and what they mean for alcohol retail monopolies in Scandinavia. And in Upcoming events we alert you about GAPC 2020, and summerLEAHP 2020…

NEWS: Research Overview: Taxing Harmful Commodities

The Center for Global Development (CGD) has compiled an useful overview of organizations conducting research into taxing harmful commodities, including tobacco, alcohol and sugary drinks.
From the CGD overview, it is evident that in comparison to tobacco taxation research initiatives and even compared to research in sugar-sweetened beverage research, much more needs to be done with regards to alcohol taxation. Research initiatives appear to be much scarcer in the field of alcohol taxation, and originate only from the World Health Organization…

NEWS: OECD: Alcohol Use, Health Risks Overview

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has released its “Health at a Glance” review for 2019. The review shows that alcohol continues to be one of the main causes of preventable mortality in OECD countries together with ischaemic heart disease, road accidents and lung cancer. The OECD also found that unhealthy lifestyles – notably smoking, alcohol use and obesity – are the root cause of many chronic health conditions, cutting lives short and worsening quality of life…

NEWS: Sweden: The Massive Costs of Alcohol

The cost of alcohol use in Sweden amounts to SEK 103 billion, annually, according to new study contracted by Systembolaget, the government run alcohol retail monopoly in Sweden. This system has ensured alcohol consumption remains controlled and relatively low in the country. Despite this alcohol has a significant social cost in Sweden. Systembolaget commissioned Ramboll to calculate the socio-economic consequences of alcohol…

MEMBER NEWS: UNF: Ranking Best Counties for Swedish Youth

UNF, the Swedish Youth Temperance Association, has released its latest report ranking the best counties in Sweden for young people to live and grow up in. Overall, 223 of 290 municipalities participated in the survey, which means a response rate of 77%. That is an increase compared to the previous year. 126 counties – or 56% – are found to be inadequate. 97 counties – 43% – are ranked as decent and 17 counties are graded as good – 7.6%).
n the new report, UNF makes 5 recommendations to leaders in the counties across Sweden, to improve the quality of leisure time activities and environments and to help increase young people’s chances to shape their own communities…

REPORT: Alcohol and “Deaths of Despair”

Alcohol plays a prominent role in deaths of despair, contributing to overdoses, suicides, and liver disease, as well as to a broad range of other disease states that lead to mortality. Alcohol use is increasing among middle-aged adults in the United States and is more common when people are faced with stressful circumstances…

REPORT: A Restrictive Alcohol Social Supply Law Change is Associated with Less Supply to Friends Under 18 Years

There was evidence of some early reductions in social supply in relation to the law change, in particular where the legislation aimed to have effect; specifically, less supply to friends under 18 years. We found no effect of the new law on parental supply. As quantities supplied are still very high, further policy restriction and public health interventions would be appropriate…

REPORT: Corporate Profits versus Spending on Non-Communicable Disease Prevention

Policy makers should acknowledge that, although tighter state intervention constrains short-term preferences (commonly decried as government over-reach or nanny-statism), measures to reduce tobacco addiction, alcohol use, and consumption of unhealthy foods are widely popular; they align with people’s longer-term preferences for long and healthy lives and increase net welfare through health gains…