Tagged: Alcohol Industry Lobbyism

BLOG: Making Sense Of “Heineken In Africa”

In this refreshing review of the book “Heineken in Africa” Viktor offers intriguing comparisons to Dostojevskij and explores questions of which findings are common for the entire alcohol industry and which ones are surprising revelations, as well as what does this case of Heineken mean for Big Alcohol in a broader sense…

NEWS: Study: Germany Has an Alcohol Problem

Germany has an alcohol problem. The country remains one of the most-addicted societies in the world, according to a new study released by the German Central Office for Addiction Issues (Deutsche Hauptstelle für Suchtfragen, DHS). And alcohol addiction is not the only dimension of alcohol harm that is affecting people, families and society in Germany…

NEWS: Big Alcohol: Amazon To Hire Alcohol Lobbyist

The online retail giant Amazon is looking to hire an alcohol business policy and lobbying expert. This suggests Amazon is planning to expand further into online retail alcohol sale.Currently Amazon dominates general online retail in USA and has expanded into grocery business and food delivery. Selling spirits has long been in the sights of the company, only limited due to the state and local laws governing alcohol sale…

NEWS: Big Alcohol Fights Against Local Alcohol Tax

The companies behind Budweiser, Miller and Guinness have poured tens of thousands of dollars of advertising money into a campaign to defeat a local Anchorage alcohol tax, new financial disclosure reports show.In a matter of weeks, a mix of national, regional and local alcohol businesses have mobilized to raise $288,000 to defeat the tax, according to the most recent disclosures…

NEWS: Heineken in Africa: The Aid Is Lagging Behind The Trade

The story of state-sponsored exploitation by the second largest beer-maker worldwide:
Heineken received millions of euros in subsidies for agricultural projects in Africa, which the government praises as an example of a successful aid and trade policy. They provide the brewer with a lot of good publicity and tax benefits, but now it appears that the objectives are far from being achieved…

REPORT: Analyzing Alcohol Industry CSR Organizations

There are concerns about the accuracy of the health information provided by alcohol industry (AI)-funded organisations and about their independence. Industry-funded bodies were significantly less likely to tweet about alcohol marketing, advertising and sponsorship; alcohol pricing; and physical health harms, including cancers, heart disease and pregnancy. They were significantly more likely to tweet about behavioural aspects of drinking and less likely to mention cancer risk. The evidence does not support claims by these alcohol-industry-funded bodies about their independence from industry…

NEWS: Researchers Call Out Sports Industry for Health-Harmful Marketing

In the latest edition of the renowned WHO Bulletin, leading researchers analyze the role sports play in promoting alcohol and other health harmful industries. The researchers suggest that alcohol and junk food promotion should be banned from sports, like how tobacco is banned…

PRESS RELEASE: Not A Love Story: Heineken In Africa

IOGT International welcomes the new book “Heineken in Africa” (first time published in English) and calls for stronger action to hold Big Alcohol accountable for pervasive Human Rights abuses…

REPORT: Hidden Power Of Corporations

The hidden power of corporations Editorial The growing literature on what are termed “the commercial determinants of health” pays particular attention to the hidden and invisible forms of power, whereby large corporations use various methods to shape thinking about what are appropriate responses to the health consequences of their products. In the accompanying article, Susan… Read more »

REPORT: Norway: Alcohol Industry Lobbyists Use Science To Advance Own Interests

Alcohol industry actors employed a range of strategies to shape the use of the various types of evidence on on-premise trading hours and violence to advance their own interests. The particular strategies and arguments changed over time as new data and research became available, and also varied between the national and the local levels and by categories of industry actors. There is a need to better understand how the handling of different forms of evidence is accommodated within the political strategies of a range of industry actors in respect of particular policy issues and forms of evidence, at different levels of policy making and in varying policy contexts…