Tagged: Women’s Health

NEWS: South Africa: Local Efforts to Tackle Alcohol Harm

Alcohol affordability and availability are thus key drivers of gender-based violence.
Alcohol has also been identified as the 3rd leading risk factor for death and disability in South Africa. In the Western Cape region, many attempts have been made over several years to prevent and reduce alcohol harm, by governments and civil society. Unfortunately, there has been little systemic success to show for all the effort.
The Western Cape Government aims to change this by focusing on interventions that make a tangible impact in terms of reducing alcohol harm – so called game changer interventions and programs.
The Western Cape Liquor Authority (WCLA) focuses on regulating alcohol availability and affordability…

NEWS: India: Women’s Alcohol Use Rising

According to a survey done in Delhi, more Indian women are consuming more alcohol. The survey was conducted by the Community Against Drunken Driving (CADD) among 5,000 women aged between 18 to 70 years in Delhi…

NEWS: Women Who Quit Booze Improve Mental Health

According to a new study women can boost their mental health by quitting alcohol completely.
Despite persisting recommendations by some that “moderate” alcohol use was not harmful to health, new findings suggest people who abstain enjoy the highest level of mental well-being.
The researchers said quitting alcohol may improve overall health-related quality of life as well as mental well-being, especially for women…

NEWS: UK: Women Largely Unaware of Alcohol’s Breast Cancer Risk

A new study discovered only 1 in 5 women attending a breast cancer clinic knew alcohol was a risk factor. This is despite 5-11% cases being due to alcohol consumption. Two hundred women took part in the study. They were either being screened for breast cancer, or having symptoms checked…

REPORT: Alcohol Use in Pregnancy and Miscarriage

This review provides evidence that alcohol consumption during pregnancy is associated with a dose‐mediated increase in miscarriage risk. Future studies evaluating change in alcohol use in pregnancy are needed to provide insight into how alcohol consumption prior to pregnancy recognition impacts risk…

NEWS: WHO: Alcohol Major Factor in Violence against Women

WHO and partners release new package to prevent violence against women. Intimate partner violence is the highest at 37.7% in the WHO South-East Asia region. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports alcohol use is a major factor behind domestic violence.
Global estimates published by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime…

NEWS: Singapore: Rising Alcohol Problems among (Young) Women

Among Singapore women, the lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse increased from 1.2% of the population in 2010 to 1.7% in 2016, according to studies.A local study on alcohol consumption trends between 1992 and 2004 reports an increase in frequent alcohol use to be most pronounced among Singapore women aged 18 to 29. At the Institute of Mental Health’s National Addictions Management Service (Nams), the number of new patients with alcohol use disorders has gone up out of these patients 15% are reportedly women…

NEWS: Global South: Mental Ill-Health Most Neglected Problem

Mental ill-health is the most neglected problem in the global south. A cocktail of issues including stigma, lack of donations and negative perceptions have lead to this neglect. Mental health is a taboo subject in many countries. This is specifically true of the global south. While in physical disease, the disease is separated from the person, in mental health issues it’s not so…

REPORT: Understanding Alcohol as an Element of ‘Care Practices’

Overall the data suggests that interventions targeting women’s alcohol consumption should start from a position that women are relational. Moreover that when care by others is lacking or unavailable, alcohol can increasingly be introduced into care practices, and the reproduction of these practices may be leading to an increase in heavy alcohol use. By seeing alcohol use in the context of wider familial and non-familial relationships, this work has important implications for future interventions…