Scientific Article
The Effect of the United Kingdom Smoking Ban on Alcohol Spending

Author
Robert Pryce (email: r.e.pryce@sheffield.ac.uk)
Citation
Pryce, R. (2019). The effect of the United Kingdom smoking ban on alcohol spending: Evidence from the Living Costs and Food Survey. Health Policy, 123(10), pp.936-940.
  • Source
    Health Policy
  • Release date
    20/09/2019

The Effect of the United Kingdom Smoking Ban on Alcohol Spending: Evidence from the Living Costs and Food Survey

Research article

Highlights

  • The UK smoking ban led to a decrease in alcohol expenditure.
  • The decrease was especially pronounced in the on-trade (pubs and restaurants) and for smoking-households.
  • The reduction in on-premise spending was roughly £1.70 per smoking-household, which is a reduction of approximately 15–20%.

Abstract

Introduction

The effect of smoking bans on alcohol consumption is unclear, and this is especially true of the differing effect on smokers and non-smokers. This paper uses spending survey data to examine the effect of the United Kingdom smoking bans on alcohol spending.

Method

It finds the introduction of a smoking ban decreased alcohol expenditure, specifically in the on-trade (pubs and restaurants) and amongst smoking households. Smoking households are estimated to have reduced their weekly on-premise alcohol expenditure by £1.70 (approximately 15–20%), whilst non-smoking households do not significantly change their expenditure. The smoking ban may therefore have affected on-premise outlets through a reduction in revenue.

Conclusion

This study provides further evidence that tobacco policies affect alcohol use behaviour.

Source Website: Science Direct